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Section 93 in The Indian Penal Code
The Indian Penal Code
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Supreme Court of India
V. S. Kuttan Pillai vs Ramakrishnan & Anr on 18 September, 1979
Equivalent citations: 1980 AIR 185, 1980 SCR (1) 673
Author: D Desai
Bench: Desai, D.A.
           PETITIONER:
V. S. KUTTAN PILLAI

	Vs.

RESPONDENT:
RAMAKRISHNAN & ANR.

DATE OF JUDGMENT18/09/1979

BENCH:
DESAI, D.A.
BENCH:
DESAI, D.A.
REDDY, O. CHINNAPPA (J)

CITATION:
 1980 AIR  185		  1980 SCR  (1) 673
 1980 SCC  (1) 264


ACT:
     Code  of  Criminal	 Procedure,  1973  Sections  91	 and
93(1)(c)-Scope of  -Appellants office  bearers of  a  Sabha-
Warrant under  s. 93(1)(c)  issued for search and seizure of
documents-Search warrant if violates fundamental right under
Article 20(3) of Constitution.
     Constitution of  India-Article 20(3)-Right	 if violated
by issue  of search  warrant under  s. 93(1)(c)	 of Cr.P.C..
1973.



HEADNOTE:
     Section 91	 of the	 Code of  Criminal  Procedure,	1973
confers power  on the  court or	 an officer  in charge	of a
police station	to issue  a summons  or written order to any
person	in   whose  possession	 or  power  a  document	 the
production of  which the  court	 or  the  officer  considers
necessary   or	 desirable   for   the	 purposes   of	 any
investigation, inquiry,	 trial or  other proceeding under D.
the Code calling upon him to produce the document.
     Section 93 of the Code contemplates three situations in
which the  court may  issue a  search warrant: (a) where the
Court has  reason to  believe that  a  person  to  whom	 the
summons or  order under s. 91 has been or might be addressed
will not  or would  not produce	 the document  or  thing  as
required by  such summons  or requisition  or (b) where such
document or  thing is  not known  to the  court to be in the
possession of  any person  or (c)  where the court considers
that the  purposes of any enquiry, trial or other proceeding
under this  code will  not be  served by a general search or
inspection, then  it may  issue a  search warrant;  and	 the
person to  whom such  warrant  is  directed  may  search  or
inspect in accordance therewith and the provisions contained
in the code.
     The complainant (respondent no. 1 ) made an application
before a  magistrate for  the issue  of a  warrant  for	 the
search and seizure of certain books and documents of a Sabha
of which  the accused were office-bearers. After the seizure
of the books and documents, on the application of one of the
accused persons, the magistrate directed their return to the
persons from  whom they	 were recovered.  In the  respondent
revision petition  the High  Court held	 that the provisions
contained in  s. 93(1)	of the	Cr.P.C. were not hit by Art.
20(3) of the Constitution.
     Dismissing the appeal,
^
     HELD: The	High  Court  was  right	 in  sustaining	 the
general search	warrant under  s. 93(1)(c) of the Code. [682
H]
     1. The  immunity against  self incrimination extends to
any  incriminating   evidence  which   the  accused  may  be
compelled to  give but	does not extend to cover a situation
where evidence which may have tendency to incrinate
674
the accused  is being collected without compelling him to be
a party to the collection of the evidence. The search of the
premises occupied  by the  accused, without  compelling	 the
accused to  be party  to such search, would not be violative
of Art. 20(3) of the Constitution. [682C]
     2. A  search and  seizure pursuant	 to a search warrant
under s.  93 (	1 )  (c) 8  of the  Code would	not have the
remotest  tendency  to	compel	an  accused  to	 incriminate
himself. He is not required to participate in the search. He
may remain a passive spectator or may even be absent. Merely
because the accused is occupying the premises to be searched
it cannot be said that by such search and consequent seizure
of documents,  including  the  document	 which	may  contain
statements attributable	 to the	 personal Knowledge  of	 the
accused and  which may	have a	tendency to incriminate him,
would violate  the constitutional  guarantee  against  self-
incrimination because  he is not compelled to do anything. A
passive submission  to search cannot be styled as compulsion
on the accused to submit to search. If anything is recovered
during the  search which  may provide incriminating evidence
against	 the   accused	it  cannot  be	called	a  compelled
testimony. [681 G-H]
     3. Section	 93(1)(c) comprehends  a situation  where  a
search warrant	can be issued as the court is unaware of not
only the  person but  even the place where the documents may
be found  and that a general search is necessary. Therefore,
power of  the court  under this clause cannot be cut down by
importing some	of the	requirements of	 cl. (b)  of the  s.
93(1). [682 F-G]
     In	 the   instant	case   although	 the  order  of	 the
magistrate was	laconic certain	 important aspects could not
be over-looked.	 The objects of the Sabha  were of a general
charitable nature.  An earlier search warrant was quashed by
the High  Court. When  the  complainant	 made  more  serious
allegation a  search warrant  was issued to conduct a search
of the institution. The office premises, the books and other
documents of the Sabha could not be said to be in possession
of any	individual accused.  They were	in the possession of
the institution.  A search  of such a public place under the
authority  of	a  general  search  warrant  can  easily  be
sustained under	 s. 93(1)(c).  Viewed  this way there was no
illegality in the Magistrate's order.
     Shyamlal Mohanlal	v. State  of Gujarat,  [1965] 2	 SCR
457, M.	 P. Sharma  &  others  v.  Satish  Chandra  District
Magistrate, Delhi  & ors.,  [19541 SCR	1077, The  State  of
Bombay	v.  Kathi  Kalu	 Gohad	&  Ors.	 [1962]	 3  SCR	 10.
explained.



JUDGMENT:

CRIMINAL APPELLATE JURISDICTION: Criminal Appeal No. 17 of 1979.

Appeal by Special Leave from the judgement and order dated 16-3-1978 of the Kerala High Court in Crl. M.P. No. 124/77.

T. C. Raghavan and N. Sudhakaran for the Appellant. Nemo for the Respondent.

675

The Judgment of the Court was delivered by A DESAI, J.-Nemo tenetu prodere-no man is bound to 'accuse himself-which finds constitutional recognition in Article 20(3) of he Constitution, conferring immunity from compelling an accused person to be a witness against himself by giving self-incriminating evidence, has been put into forefront to support a prayer for quashing he search warrant issued by the Sub-Divisional Magistrate, Always, on 4th January ]977 directing The Deputy Superintendent of Police, Always, to search the premises styled as the office of H.M.D.P. Sabha ('Sabha' for short), Moothakunam, and to seize the books, documents and papers as set out in the application for issuance of search warmly. The Magistrate had before him a complaint filed by the first respondent Ramakrishnan against the petitioner and S others for having committed offences under sections 403, 409, 420 and 477A read with s. 34, Indian Penal Code. Original accused 1, and accused 2 the present petitioner, were respectively President and Secretary of the Sabha and original accused 3 to 6 were described as Managers of the Institution. The complainant made an application on 4th January 1977 requesting the learned Magistrate to issue a search warrant to search the office premises of the Sabha and seize the books, documents, etc. described in the application, if found therein. On the very day the Magistrate issued a search warrant and in fact it was executed and certain books, vouchers and papers were produced before the Court. The present petitioner (original accused 2) requested the learned Magistrate to recall the warrant and to return the books and documents seized under the authority of the search warrant. The learned Magistrate was of the opinion that in view of the decision of this Court in Shyamlal Mohanlal v. State of Gujarat(l), and an earlier decision of V. Khalid, J. Of Kerala High Court, no search warrant could be issued under s. 91 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 ('new Code' for short), and accordingly directed that anything recovered pursuant to the search warrant Issued by him be returned to the person from whom the same were recovered. The order was, however, to take effect after the decision on the requisition which was by then received from the Income- Tax officer under s. 132A of the Income Tax Act. First respondent (original complainant) preferred a revision application to the High Court of Kerala questioning the correctness of the decision of the learned Magistrate and the claim to constitutional immunity of the accused from search and seizure of books, documents, etc. directed with a view to collecting evidence against him, being violative of Art. 20(3) of the Cons-

676

titution was canvassed before the Court. The High Court after an exhaustive review of the decisions of this Court as well as those bearing on the Fifth Amendment to the American constitution held that the provisions relating to search contained in s. 93(1) of the Criminal Procedure Code, 1973, are not hit by Article 20(3) of the Constitution.

Section 91 confers power on the Court or an officer in charge of a J police station to issue a summons or written order as the case may be, to any person in whose possession or power a document, the production of which the Court or the officer considers necessary or desirable for the purposes of any investigation, inquiry, trial or other proceeding under the Code. Section 93 confers power on the Court to issue search warrant under three different situations.

Sections 91 and 93, so far as they are relevant, read as under:

"91. (1) Whenever any Court or any officer in charge of a police station considers that the production of any document or other thing is necessary or desirable for the purposes of any investigation, inquiry, trial or other proceeding under this Code by or before such Court or officer, such Court may issue a summons, or such officer a written order, to the person m whose possession or power such document or thing is believed to be, requiring him to attend and produce it, or to produce it, at the time and place stat ed in the summons or order."
"93. (l)(a) Where any Court has reason to believe that a person to whom a summons or order under section 91 or a requisition under sub-section ( 1 ) of section 92 has been, or might, be, addressed, will not or would not produce the document or thing as required by such summons or requisition, or
(b) where such document or thing is not known to the Court to be in the possession of any person, or
(c) where the Court considers that the purposes of any inquiry, trial or other proceeding under this Code will be served by a general search or inspection, it may issue a search-warrant; and the person to whom such warrant is directed, may search or inspect in accordance therewith and the provisions hereinafter contained".

In exercise of the power conferred by s. 91 a summons can be issued by the Court to a person in whose possession or power any 677 document or other thing considered necessary or desirable for the purpose of any investigation, inquiry, trial or other proceeding under the Code calling upon him to produce the document or thing at the time and place to be mentioned in the summons. On the advent of the Constitution, and especially in view of the provision contained in Art. 20(3), Courts were faced with a problem whether the person referred to in s. 91(1) of the Code (s 94 of old Code) would include an accused. In other words, the question was whether a summons can be addressed to the accused calling upon him to produce any document which may be in his possession or power and which is necessary or desirable for the purpose of an investigation, inquiry, trial, etc. in which such person was an accused person. The wider question that was raised soon after the enforcement of the Constitution was whether search of the premises occupied or in possession of a person accused of an offence or seizure of anything therefrom would violate the immunity from self-incrimination enacted in Article 20(3). In M. P. Sharma & others v. Satish Chandra, District Magistrate, Delhi & ors.,(ll) the contention put forth was that a search to obtain document for investigation into an offence is- a compulsory procuring of incriminatory evidence from the accused himself and is, therefore, hit by Art. 20(3) as unconstitutional and illegal. A specific reference was made to ss. 94 and 96 of the Criminal Procedure Code, 1898 ('old Code' for short), both of which are re-enacted in almost identical language as ss. 91 and 93 in the new Code, in support of the submission that a seizure of documents on search is in the contemplation or law a compelled production of documents. A Constitution Bench of 8 judges of this Court unanimously negatived this contention observing:

"A power of search and seizure is in any system of jurisprudence an overriding power of the State for the protection of social security and that power is necessarily regulated by law. When the Constitution makers have thought fit not to subject such regulation to constitutional limitations by recognition of a fundamental right to privacy, analogous to the American Fourth Amendment, we have no justification to import it, into a totally different fundamental right, by some process of strained construction. Nor is it legitimate to assume that the constitutional protection under Article 20(3) would be defeated by the statutory provisions for searches".
678

It was concluded that a search under the enabling provisions of the Criminal Procedure Code cannot be challenged as illegal on the ground of violation of Article 20(3). It must be made clear that the question whether there is any element of compulsion in issuing a summons to a person accused of an offence under s. 94 (old) s. 91 (new) to produce a document or thing in his possession or power considered n necessary or desirable for any inquiry, investigation or, trial under the Code of Criminal Procedure was kept open. In other words, the question whether the expression 'person' in s. 94 (old) s. 91 (new) would comprehend a person accused of an offence was left open.

Following the decision in M. P. Sharma's case, a Division Bench of the Madras High Court in Swarnalingam Chettiar v. Assistant Labour Inspector, Karaikudi(l) held that a summons could not be issued under s. 94 of the old Code to the accused for production of certain documents in his possession irrespective of the fact whether those documents contained some statement of the accused made of his personal knowledge and accordingly the summons issued to the accused to produce certain documents was quashed. After the matter went back to the trial court, on an application of the Sub-Inspector investigating the case, for a search warrant to be issued to obtain documents mentioned in the list attached to the petition and likely to be found upon a search of the premises of Karaikudi Railway out Agency, the Magistrate issued a notice to the accused to show cause E, why a general search warrant as asked for should not be issued. Again the accused moved the High Court in revision and in Swarnalingam Chettiar v. Assistant Inspector of Labour Karaikudi(2) the High Court quashed the notice holding that such notice practically amounts to stating that either he produces the document or else the premises will be searched and this will amount to testimonial compulsion held impermissible by the decision of the Supreme Court in M. P. Sharma's case (supra). This view of the Madras High Court is no more good law in view of the later decisions of this Court.

In The Slate of Bombay v. Kathi Kalu Oghad & Ors.,(3) a question arose whether obtaining specimen hand writing or thumb impression of the accused would contravene the constitutional guarantee in Art. 20(3). In this case there was some controversy about certain observations in M. P. Sharma's case (supra) and, therefore, the matter was heard by a Bench of 11 Judges. Two opinions were handed down, one by Chief Justice Sinha for himself and 7 brother judges, and another by Das Gupta, J. for himself and 2 other colleagues. In Sinha, CJ's opinion, the observation in M. P.

679

Sharma's case (supra) that s. 139 of the Evidence Act has no bearing on the connotation of the word 'witness' is not entirely well-founded in law. Immunity from self- incrimination as re-enacted in Art. 20(3) was held to mean conveying information based upon the personal knowledge of the person giving the information and could not include merely the mechanical process of producing documents in court which may throw a light on any of the points in controversy, but which do not contain any statement of the accused based on his personal knowledge. It was concluded that to be a witness is not equivalent to furnishing evidence in its widest significance; that is to say, as including not merely making of oral or written statement but also production of document or giving materials which may be relevant at trial to determine the innocence or guilt of the' accused.

What was kept open in Sharma's case (supra) whether a person accused of an offence could be served with a summons to produce documents was decided when it was observed that immunity from self-incrimination would not comprehend the mechanical process of producing documents in court which may throw a light on any of the points in controversy but which do not contain a statement of the accused based on his personal knowledge.

The matter again came up before a Constitution Bench of this Court in Shyamlal Mohanlal v. State of Gujarat(l). In that case appellant Shyamlal Mohanlal was a licensed money- lender and according to the provisions of the relevant Money Lending Act and Rules he was under an obligation to maintain books. He was prosecuted for failing to maintain books in accordance with the provisions of the Act and the Rules. The police prosecutor incharge of the case on behalf of the prosecution presented an application requesting the Court to order the appellant Shyamlal Mohanlal to produce daily book and ledger for a certain year. Presumably it was a request to issue summons as contemplated by s. 94 of the old Code. The Learned Magistrate rejected the request on the ground that in so doing the guarantee of immunity from self- incrimination would be violated. The matter ultimately came to this Court and the question that was put in forefront before the Court was whether the expression 'person' in s. 94(1) which is the sale as s. 91(1) of the new Code, comprehends within its sweep a person accused of an offence and if it does, whether an issue of summons to produce a document in his possession or power would violate the immunity against self-incrimination guaranteed by Article 20(3). The majority opinion handed down by Sikri, J. ruled that s. 94(1) upon its true construction does not 680 apply to an accused person. While recording this opinion there is no reference to the decision of the larger Bench in Kathi Kalu oghad's case (supra). Shah, J. in his dissenting judgment referred to the observation that the accused may have documentary evidence in his possession which may throw some light on the controversy and if it is a document which is not his statement conveying his personal Knowledge relating to the charge against him, he may be called upon to produce it. Proceeding further it was observed that Art. 20(3) would be no bar to the summons being issued to a person accused of an offence to produce a thing or document except in the circumstances herein above mentioned. Whatever that may be, it is indisputable that according to the majority opinion the expression 'person' in s. 91(1) (new Code) does not take within its sweep a person accused of an offence which would mean that a summons issued to an accused person to produce a thing or document considered necessary or desirable for the purpose of an investigation, inquiry or trial would imply compulsion and the document or thing so produced would be compelled testimony and would be violative of the constitutional immunity against self-incrimination.

There appears to be some conflict between the observations in M. P. Sharma's case (supra) as reconsidered in Kothi Kala oghad's case (supra) and the one in the case of Shyamlal Mohanlal (supra). However, as this case is not directly relatable to a summons issued under s. 91(1), we do not consider it necessary to refer the matter to a larger Bench to resolve the conflict.

In view of the decision in Shyamlal Mohanlal's case (supra) one must proceed on the basis that a summons to produce a thing or document as contemplated by s. 91(1) cannot be issued to a person accused of an offence calling upon him to produce document or thing considered necessary or desirable for the purpose of an investigation, inquiry, trial or other proceeding under the Code of Criminal Procedure.

If summons as hereinbefore discussed cannot be issued to an accused person under s. 91(1), ipso facto a search warrant contemplated by s. 93(1) (a) cannot be issued by the Court for the obvious reason that it can only be issued where the Court could have issued a summons but would not issue the same under the apprehension that the person to whom such summons is issued will not or would not produce the thing as required by such summons or requisition. A search warrant under s. 93(1)(a) could only be issued where a summons could have been issued under s. 91(1) but the same would not be issued on an apprehension that the person, to whom 681 the summons is directed would not comply with the same and, there- A fore, in order to obtain the document or thing to produce which the summons was to be. issued, a search warrant may be issued under s. 93 (1) (a) .

Section 93, however, also envisages situations other than one contemplated by s. 93(1)(a) for issuance of a search warrant. It must be made distinctly clear that the present search warrant is not issued under s. 93 ( 1 ) (a) .

Section 93(1) (b) comprehends a situation where a search warrant may be issued to procure a document or thing not known to the Court to be in the possession of any person. In other words, a general search warrant may be issued to procure the document or thing and it can be recovered from any person who may be ultimately found in possession of it and it was not known to the Court that the person from whose possession it was found was in possession of it. In the present case the search warrant was to be executed at the office of the Sabha and it can be said that office bearers of the Sabha were the persons who were in possession of the documents in respect of which the search warrant was issued. Therefore, clause (b) of s. 93(1) would not be attracted.

Section 93(1) (c) of the new Code comprehends a situation where the Court may issue a search warrant when it considers that the purpose of an inquiry, trial or other proceeding under the Code will be served by a general search or inspection to search, seize and produce the documents mentioned in the list. When such a general search warrant is issued, in execution of it the premises even in possession of the accused can be searched and documents found therein can be seized irrespective of the fact that the documents may contain some statement made by the accused upon his personal knowledge and which when proved may have the tendency to incriminate the accused. However, such a search and seizure pursuant to a search warrant issued under s. 93(1) (c) will not have even the remotest tendency to compel the accused to incriminate himself. He is expected to do nothing. He is not required to participate in the search. He may remain a passive spectator. He may even remain absent. Search can be conducted under the authority of such warrant in the presence of the accused. Merely because he is occupying the premises which is to be searched under the authority of the search warrant it cannot even remotely be said that by such search and consequent seizure of documents including the documents which may contain statements attributable to the personal knowledge of the 682 accused and which may have tendency to incriminate him, would violate the constitutional guarantee against self- incrimination because he is not compelled to do anything. A passive submission to search cannot be styled as a compulsion on the accused to submit to search and if anything is recovered during search which may provide incriminating evidence against the accused it cannot be styled as compelled testimony. This is too obvious to need any precedent in support. The immunity against self- crimination extends to any incriminating evidence which the accused may be compelled to give. It does not extend to cover such situation as where evidence which may have tendency to incriminate the accused is being collected without in any manner compelling him or asking him to be a party to the collection of the evidence. Search of the premises occupied by the accused without the accused being compelled to be a party to such search would not be violative of the constitutional guarantee enshrined in Article 20(3). .

It was, however, urged that s. 93(1) (c) must be read in the context of s. 93(1) (b) and it would mean that where documents are known to be at a certain place and in possession of a certain person any general search warrant as contemplated by s. 93(1) (c) will have to be ruled out because in such a situation s. 93(1)(a) alone would be attracted. Section 93(1)(b) comprehends a situation where the Court issues a search warrant in respect of a document or a thing to be recovered from a certain place but it is not known to the Court whether that document or thing is in possession of any particular person. Under clause (b) there is a definite allegation to recover certain document or thing from a certain specific place but the Court is unaware of the fact whether that document or thing or the place is in possession of a particular person. Section 93(1)(c) comprehends a situation where a search warrant can be issued as the Court is unaware of not only the person but even the place where the documents may be found and that a general search is necessary. One cannot, therefore, cut down the power of the Court under s. 93(1) (c) by importing into it some of the requirements of s. 93(1)(b). No canon of construction would permit such an erosion of power of the Court to issue a general search warrant. It also comprehends not merely a general search but even an inspection meaning thereby inspection of a place and a general search thereof and seizure of documents or things which the Court considers necessary or desirable for the purpose of an investigation, inquiry, trial or other proceeding under the Code. The High Court accordingly sustained the general search warrant in this case under s. 93(1)(c).

683

Turning to the facts of this case it was contended that the order of the Magistrate clearly disclosed an utter non- application of mind and a mere mechanical disposal of the application before the Court. Undoubtedly the order is of a laconic nature. But then there are certain aspects of the case which cannot be overlooked before this Court would interfere in such an interlocutory order.

The appellant and his co-accused are office bearers of a public institution styled as H.M.D.P. Sabha. We were informed at the hearing of this petition that this Sabha is a public institution engaged in the. activity of running educational institutions and supporting objects or activities of a general charitable nature. When the first complaint was filed, the allegation therein was that criminal breach of trust in respect of funds of the public institution has been committed by the office bearers thereof. A search warrant was issued but it was quashed by the Kerala High Court. Thereafter an other complaint was filed making some more serious allegations and a search warrant was sought. Now, this search warrant was being issued to conduct search of the premises used as office of an institution. The place will be in possession of the institution. The office bearers of the Sabha are accused of an offence. Documents and books of accounts of the institution are required for the purpose of the trial against the office bearers of the institution. The office premises could not be said to be in possession of any individual accused but stricto sensu it would be in possession of the institution. Books of accounts and other documents of the institution could not be said to be in personal custody or possession of the office bearers of the institution but they are in possession of the institution and are lying in the office of the institution. A search of such a public place under the authority of a general search warrant can easily be sustained under s. 93(1)(c). If the order of the learned Magistrate is construed to mean this, there is no, illegality committed in issuing a search warrant. Of course, issuance of a search warrant is a serious matter and it would be advisable not to dispose of an application for search warrant in a mechanical way by a laconic order. Issue of search warrant being in the discretion of the Magistrate it would be reasonable to expect of the Magistrate to give reasons which swayed his discretion in favour of granting the request. A clear application of mind by the learned Magistrate must be discernible in the order granting the search warrant. Having said this, we see no justification for interfering with the order of the High Court in this case.

P.B.R.					   Appeal dismissed.
684